Higher Level Thinking

Critical Literacy Higher Level Thinking

These questions can be applied to a variety of learning situations. Keep this list handy in order to be able to stimulate higher level thinking and critical literacy with your students.

  1. What could have happened if…..
  2. What theme do you notice emerging?
  3. How is this similar to…………
  4. Compare this with something you’ve experienced that is similar.
  5. What other outcomes could have happened?
  6. How is this similar to……….
  7. Why did the author make ……………………..happen?
  8. What questions would you pose to the author?
  9. What was the point of……………..
  10. What would you have done differently? Why?
  11. How else could this story have ended?
  12. What would your position have been with this problem?
  13. How would you have responded to………
  14. How would you have handled ……
  15. What change you would recommend? Why?
  16. How would you feel if……
  17. Defend the author’s position on…………………..
  18. Discuss the importance of part when…………….
  19. What were the 3 most important events? Defend your answer.
  20. Predict what could take place in a sequel.
  21. What was the turning point? What makes you think this?
  22. Compare a character with you.
  23. What is the purpose? Why?
  24. How could you improve…………….
  25. What needs to be improved…..
  26. How could it have been done differently?
  27. How could this change to meet the needs of a different audience?
  28. What do you wonder about?
  29. How has this influenced you?
  30. What advice do you have for the author?
  31. What point of view did the author take? Could there be different point of views?  What would they be?
  32. What are the author’s values, beliefs and attitudes? How do you know?
  33. What is the audience being targeted? How do you know?
  34. Could some people interpret this differently? How?
  35. How do the images influence your thinking?
  36. Are the images needed? Why or why not?
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